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respect for the bond shared by those who experienced combat -- from medal of honor awardee dan inouye, bob kerrey, who also won that coveted award. john mccain, fritz hollings, john kerry, bob dole, and others. all of whom served their country with valor. here is what warren rudman said about that -- if you have had that experience, not much is left in life that will intimate you. nothing did intimate warren rudman. he was fearless in the pursuit for the right. he served on the ethics committee where i first got to know him -- warren rudman. justice souter and i talked about that a few days ago. i got a call from him and he asked me to come over and spend some time with him. i was happy to do that. he gave me an assignment. i was a new senator. the assignment was not an easy one. they thought i could do it. it worked out just fine. i got to know him very well. on the ethics committee, he was known as mr. integrity. he was known as mr. integrity in everything he did in life. that put a big exclamation mark on his service in the senate. it is because of him and his high regard for this young
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
pass if you have that opportunity? >> it would be a three-pitcher event. i hear bob packwood about the history of putting his bill together 30 years ago. i am impressed by a kinder and gentler time it was, to have the kind of easy communication of lloyd bentsen about a little problem that he has to have resolved. it is a different era. it was revenue neutral was a great advantage to you in that effort, and even though you can quickly get to it, it was a two-year process. of educating not only the public but the members involved. i would argue that the interest groups embedded in tax expenditures are even stronger today. it is not just about the guys who want to go sailing or play golf. they have tv ads running, grass-roots operations out there. >> but there is one thing else. in 1986, there were no cellphones. they had to find a wired telephone to call, and by the time they had done that, it was already passed. >> this is very hard to do. as bill outlined earlier, you can see where the groups are lining up. the easiest thing they can bring about is gridlock and doing nothing. i am
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever i went, people would say, i work for jack kemp. that legacy lives on some much because of the connection to the family. there was something this legacy .as such reach hi it is an honor to be a part of this an. j
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
to the floor. the bill is not moving along, says bob corker from tennessee. here is what the republican from idaho had to say about the fiscal cliff negotiation. [video clip] >> if we get down to the end of the year and the only choice we have is to save taxes going up on the middle-class, i would support that. but i wish we had a comprehensive bill that dealt with spending, entitlement, and taxes altogether. that is really what we ought to do. host: that was senator johnny isaacson from georgia, excuse me, not from idaho. we will go back to the question here for all of you. we will continue to give you news from the newspapers. but how does religion and law was your politics? democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i had originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferso
hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- ileanaan friends, ke ros-lehtinen and bob menendez and we worked hard to put sanctions on castro to try to bring that regime down. it was not until the soviet mig that was shot down, they shot a couple of them down. one of them made it back. that created a huge for error -- furor. bill clinton was put in a difficult position. i was the author in the house and the jesse helms was the author in the senate and we worked together on the bill along with my cuban-american brands. >> that regime is still around. at the time, a number of our allies protested the bill. in the rearview mirror, how effective was it overall? do you feel good about that? >> it shows the repression is so strong in cuba, the ability of fidel castro to reach out to some of his "friends" around the world that he has been able to circumvent sanctions. i think we ought to do everything we can to bring freedom to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my g
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
and by the president. first of all, thank you, bob for that kind introduction. thanks for being so persist nt. i'm glad to have the chance now to come. in reflecting for my fair well address in the senate, i thought back to what motivated me to run for the united states senate. about 48 years ago i came to washington as a 16-year-old, sat in the gallery and watched a debate occur on civil rights. and i thought at the time some day i'd like to do that. i'd like to represent my state and i'd like to debate the great issues of the day. and after that trip i went home and i wrote on the back of an informal that i would run for the united states senate in 1986 or 1988 and i ran in 1986 and won what was considered to be the biggest political up senate north dakota history. so that is the power of a plan. and clearly our country now needs a plan. we need a fiscal plan. we need a plan that is going to bring us back from the brink because most economist tell us on our current course over the next several decades we will hit a debt that will be 230% of our gdp, clearly unsustainable. so we need a plan to get us
or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyone is going crazy and what robert byrd is doing even though they hate filibusters. one thing that
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11